The Food TruckCategory: General   Aug 9th 2012  12:28PM   0

I was at one of my favorite food trucks today grabbing a delicious lunch.  I struck up a conversation with the woman next to me who was about a thousand times more excited about the food on this truck. She had come all the way from the UWS for lunch there and joked she would have the menu tattooed on her arm if she could. (Actually someone did get the company logo tattooed on his arm! ) We looked at the menu together, while she raved about it all (she had eaten everything on the menu - I am fairly a newbie)  And, for the girl who was saving her award-winning dessert for an afternoon snack, my new truck buddy exclaimed "I'd eat it in two seconds! It wouldn't last a minute with me!"   I was struck by how much I enjoyed this conversation with this woman and had a blast gushing over the menu with her.

I notice a lot of the conversations with strangers, especially in retail or food service,  often spring out of a complaint about something, a shared annoyance. I cannot remember the last time I've had this kind of conversation with someone I did not know. It was a mutual joyful raving about how great something was. I wanted to give her a friendly hug by the end. I found even though I may never see this woman again I instantly liked her, a woman with big passion and gusto who wasn't afraid to be big and boisterous about something she loved.

It reminded me of a quote I saw recently by the actor Simon Peg :

"Being a geek is all about being honest about what you enjoy and not being afraid to demonstrate that affection. It means never having to play it cool about how much you like something. It’s basically a license to proudly emote on a somewhat childish level rather than behave like a supposed adult. Being a geek is extremely liberating.”

 

It also reminds me of an experience I had when I was in middle school. I took this summer class where you got to write a play and then kids in the class would pick which one they wanted to be in and we would put the play on. I wrote a play about the woes of kindergarten. I had some geeky kids and some cool kids sign up. I noticed that the cool kids had a lot of trouble with it. They were terrified of doing anything that may make them look "uncool". They couldn't really do anything but sit around and look unaffected. But, the geeky kids were so much fun to work with (I being a fellow geek). They were never going to be cool and it didn't really bother them too much. They jumped in with both feet and were extraordinarily good at bringing the little play to life. Their creativity was free-wheeling and unencumbered. After that experience I felt bad for the cool kids. We were actually the ones having more fun.

So, here's to being loud and proud about all the things that gets your motor running.

Enjoy your day!


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